Twa Corbies for Poppy Day

American Crow
American Crow

Actually, there were four. I am pretty sure this was the same group of crows I saw earlier this year. I hope this means they will stick around.

As is typical with crows, it was the great hullabaloo they were making that first drew my attention. I looked up into the sky and saw four crows chasing something out of the area. It might have been an egret. It was big and white …

ok yeah I know. That makes them sound like bad guys. But even so I wished I happened to have some road kill or something to throw at them to encourage them to stay after they settled down. That’s the trouble with going vegan — you never have any meat handy.

Seeing them on the eve of Remembrance Day made me think of this poem: The Twa Corbies

Speaking of Poppy Day …

With sorrow I notice that once again we are celebrating Remembrance Day without actually remembering its original intent. This holiday started as a way of remembering the war to end all wars but it has turned into a kind of death cult where people tend to throw a barbecue and maybe thank a vet. Or enjoy some holiday shopping. Doesn’t a holiday like that just cheapen the value of human life and allow politicians to continue to wage perpetual war?

No barbecue or shopping for me. I’m going to scatter the last of my field poppy seed and make a wish for peace instead.

This year, I will wear a poppy for the last time by Harry Leslie Smith

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18 thoughts on “Twa Corbies for Poppy Day

  1. I love the image of you tossing roadkill to the crows.
    Thank a vet day – how weird that remembrance day should end up as that.
    In Britain I despair of the way it has been taken over by the far right as an excuse for jingoism. We should of course remember those who lost their lives in the 2 world wars but the sentimental talk of them laying down their lives like heros, for us makes me angry. Of course they were heroic , but they had no choice, they were conscripted and cynically sent to their deaths. Remembering the thousands and thousands of deaths should be an occasion for despair at the terrible waste of lives and the hideousness of war rather than a celebration of pointless heroism. As you say ‘The war to end all wars’ bit seems to have been forgotten.

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    1. Thanks for saying this, Chloris. I like to be a polite person but I think we are too polite when we let people change the discourse to the point where it turns into a lie.

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  2. I haven’t worn a poppy for years and generally find the current trend of rememberance fairly distasteful. somewhere along the way we forgot a lesson we were trying to learn about life and respect – mostly I feel a great sadness that there is so many wars continuing and so much violence perpetrated . great thing to do debra – plant the seed of poppies and make a wish. I’ll wish with you – I feel peace is a worthy experiment and we might be surprised at how good at it we can become.
    fingers xxxxx
    Sandra

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  3. We do not have a public holiday in the UK, instead we have Remembrance Sunday and a two minute silence on the 11th for those who observe it. I can’t argue with Harry’s decision not to wear a Poppy, but they do raise a large amount of money and especially in this centenary year of WW1 they help create an opportunity for discussion with the younger generation. I will wear mine.

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    1. I think it was probably a difficult decision for him to make. I miss wearing poppies. I don’t know about the UK or what happens now in Canada but it used to be that the money would go to helping vets with disabilities. Plus, as you say, they do create an opportunity for discussion.

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      1. Over here the Royal British Legion who run the Poppy Appeal had set the target of raising £40 million to help with their welfare work for bereaved families, wounded Service men and women, younger veterans seeking employment and housing and older veterans needing age-related care. I do not know wether they have achieved this years target. There are several other war related charities too raising funds independently of the Poppy appeal. Its a personal choice how to remember or donate or wether a different charity is a priority. There has been over 5 million visitors to the Tower of London Poppy display this year, the response has been incredible and that has done brilliant work to raise awareness for 6 different war related charities and for other generations to know more about the first world war. Planting Poppy seeds would be my choice too.

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        1. I think most people understand peace is a worthy goal. The only trouble is that the people who make the decisions haven’t quite worked it out. I hate seeing them use this holiday for their twisted purposes.

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  4. I think I’ll follow your lead on the poppies–I have a few left from previous seasons.

    I like crows, much the same way I like grackles (the bird everyone loves to hate). I think there’s a cheekiness and intelligence about them–like they’re in on some joke, that maybe we don’t get.

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    1. I spent a good long while watching that particular crow. It seemed to be the one barking out orders to the others. I have heard they can recognize people so I hope they can come to know me as a crow friend. This group is as wild as can be and fearful though.

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  5. A rather gruesome tune of the corbies. :-(

    I noticed an onslaught of f-book posts last night and this morning about honoring those who serve(d) in the military. I’m in favor of the peace approach myself.

    Don’t get me wrong. My son is in the Air Force. I have nothing against their need to exist. What I dislike is using them the way we have since 2003.

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    1. I know right. This is one of those taboo issues. I saw a bus drive past today and its sign suggested everyone should ‘thank a vet’ today. I thought the members of our elite really ought to thank vets for making their lives so comfortable. But the rest of us might want to ‘ask a vet’ what they think or how they feel about it all.

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