Quote of the Day

Actually maybe for a lifetime …. I like it THAT much. The language of soil is in its plants. Some places are living poems while others are ….

“Not to sound New-Age-y, but soil is constantly talking to us, communicating what it needs. It shoots up milkweed if it’s hungry for zinc, and wild garlic if it needs more sulfur. If you see chicory or Queen Anne’s lace in a field, that means the soil is low in fertility. There’s a real language to the soil, and the more I learned about it, the more I felt engaged by the conversation, especially when I realized its connection to great-tasting food.”

From an interview with Dan Barber found here.DSCN2918

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12 thoughts on “Quote of the Day

    1. Thanks, Donna. Ladybugs are so cute they make it easy. =) If he is right it would go a long way toward explaining the modern tasteless tomato.

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  1. A great quote. Now that I have raised beds I am working hard to create great soil for my veg. When you are starting from scratch to build up beds it makes you much more aware of your soil and what goes into it.

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    1. I totally agree. The soil here is compacted clay (read: practically cement). Most of my time learning about how to garden has been about looking into how to baby the soil.

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  2. Love the quote…and thank you for the good information. Soil is amazing! We get our organic weekly farm share…I make soup when I can’t figure out what to do with the array of veggies : )

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    1. =) I have noticed a similar process here. There is one section of our lawn that never gets water. The sprinkler system can’t reach and when we moved in it was just dry dust. I have been watching that little corner and it confirms everything I learned about succession and invasive plants. Every year something new moves into that space and every year it just gets better and better. Eventually there will be good soil there even with no effort from us. I have to admit I am kind of geeky about soil. Some people collect pens … some people look at soil and what grows in it.

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  3. Great chef, great quote and great idea/s espoused. We are using a CSA service this summer because it forces me to think about how to use and cook with a much wider variety of fresh local organic veggies than anything I’d pick up at local markets. Without a kick in the basket, I tend to stick to the tried and true familiar few. Thanks very much for sharing! (and I’ll second Tina’s applause for your photos – they are always wonderful).

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    1. Thanks, Deb. We subscribed to one of those services for awhile and it really was a great way to add some diversity to our diet. I had never even seen collard greens before for example. haha ( I know … ) But it was fun looking up recipes and trying new things.

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  4. Interesting article. Certainly, the best meals I’ve ever had, whether in a restaurant, at someone’s home, or even my own cooking, involved a more complex menu than just the “protein centric” meal. Maybe with one exception: at The Fishes restaurant in Oxford–yum, salmon. But also, with a variety of local veggies. Debra, do you take all these photos–especially your header photos? They are all just phenomenal! A joy to behold!

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    1. Gee, thanks Tina. The photos are usually mine. When they aren’t I try to remember to credit them. My husband gave me a camera for my birthday and I have been having so much fun with it. I am so glad you enjoy them. =)

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